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This music chart was published on the Issue 447 of The Wire Magazine and it was inspired by works dealing with sounds sourced from commutes to work, public transportation, sonic interpretations of landscapes adjacent to roads or train tracks, and oral testimonies around transportation infrastructures.

Discontinued Commutes 15

Yara Mekawei & Mina NasrShubra Line (Atrellewa)

Claudia Molitor – Sonorama (Electra)

Ain BaileyFive Car Train To Fremont (Resterecords)

Michelle MoellerSpoke (Bandcamp)

Philip PerkinsDrive Time (Fun Music)

TAMTAMA100 (Crónica)

Jean-Luc Guionnet, Dan Warburton, Eric La CasaMetro Pré Saint-Gervais (Swarming) 

Odland + AuingerRome: Traffic Mantra 1992 (Secrets of the Sun)

Janek Schaefer – Radio 104 FM (12k)

Luís Costa Da serra para a fábrica: O meu mapa do bairro (Binaural Radio Rural/SoundCloud)

Christian ZanésiGrand Bruit  (Recollection GRM)

Felicity FordAround the A4074 (BBC Radio Oxford)

Tamio Shiraishi2009・05・23 67Avenue (PSF)

Viv CorringhamThe River Fleet Walk (Extracts) (The Diagram) 

Marc BehrensA Narrow Angle: Taipei Metro Easycard 500 NT$ (Entr’acte)

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The Pursuit is a collection of radiophonic pamphlets on professional development, career anxiety, and mindsets for excellence. Learn how to navigate brand new advertising opportunities, implement storytelling that really works, and build a business identity that merges the real YOU with the latest landscape of corporate expectations and client satisfaction. This system works pretty well.

The Pursuit was created for the show Radio Row on WFMU and aired on January 2021.  

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On Jan 17, I hosted one hour of radio on Radio Row, a new show on WFMU, run by the station music director Olivia Bradley-Skill. This hour featured new radio collages under the banner of career anxiety, show business tips, and self-help. Also, featuring listener calls, and other collages taken from the piece Second Hand Third Eye.

Listen here:

https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/100282

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Hudson River fishermen heading out at dawn, Peter Lourie, 1998
Hudson River fishermen heading out at dawn, Peter Lourie, 1998

Last February 2020, I visited the Constitution Marsh Audubon Center and Sanctuary Trail in the Hudson River to make some field recordings of the environment surrounding the brackish tidal marsh. The Constitution Marsh is one of five large estuarine environments connected to the Hudson River and provides natural habit to several species of birds, fish, plants, and many vertebrate and invertebrate species. This wetland area is located on the east side of the Hudson, near Cold Spring, and is surrounded by the Hudson Highlands.

The soundscape above was recorded on a small hill overlooking the tidal marsh. It was a very windy day, so I sheltered the microphone between the rocky steps of the trail. The resulting recording captures the sounds of branches and dry leaves rustling in the wind, bird calls, and the sound of the Amtrak train on the distance with its characteristic horn. The marsh provides foraging, nesting, and resting habitat to more than 200 species of birds. However, this New York State Bird Conservation Area is still subject to a large conglomeration of human-made noises like the train and low flying airplanes.

Hiking trail at Constitution Marsh Audubon Center and Sanctuary Photo Jessica Andreone.jpg

Inside a hollow tree, 2’14”. Feb 2020, download

The more pervasive sound in the area is the constant sound of airplanes. I tried to record the sound of a passing aircraft through the vibrating trunk of a tree by placing a microphone inside of a hollow tree. The airplane’s sound reverberating on the wooden walls resulted in an eerie drone sound.

Reeds, Water and Wind, 2’08”. Feb 2020, download

Phragmites australis, the common reed, is a non-native marsh plant spreading in many of the Hudson River wetlands. This plant forms fast-growing stands of stems, transforming the diversity of the habitat into a monoculture by crowding out native vegetation. Reeds introduce changes to the local microtopography, increase fire potential, decrease salinity, and outcompete plants. These changes have a ripple effect that ends up degrading the diversity of wetlands and coastal marshes and endangering wildlife. The Constitution Marsh Audubon Center dedicates its conservation efforts to the control and management of reeds in the area by using black geotextile material to flatten and cover patches of the vegetation. This method raises the temperature of the soil, killing the root system of the plant, allowing for the future growth of native vegetation.

Small brook flowing into the tidal marsh, Hudon River, 2’08”. Feb 2020, download

Carlo Patrão
*photos by the Constitution Marsh Audubon Center

Hudson River map

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